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INDICATOR GUIDE & RECOMMENDED INDICATORS 

The Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool is one of a suite of applied Community Well-being tools developed by SGIGs to form part of the online Data Governance and Management toolkit. This Tool provides a list of well-being indicators aligned within the Conceptual Well-being Framework with guidance about indicator selection and customization. This Tool builds upon the Conceptual Well-being Framework Tool by recommending indicators within each of its eight domains:

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Core Well-being

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Health

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Culture, Language, Heritage & Identity

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Infrsatructure, Programs & Services

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Leadership and Governance

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Education, Capacity & Employment

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Land, Stewardship & Environment

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External Influence

Below is a summary of the Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool, including a webinar video for further guidance. The full Tool is downloadable as a PDF and contains additional information and example indicators for each of the eight domains featured in the above graphic. For each indicator, a definition and suggested way to calculate the indicator is provided, along with a survey question. However, given the significant diversity among SGIGs, before the Recommended Indicator List is presented, this Tool begins with an orientation to indicators and considerations designed to support SGIGs to customize the indicators, and the indicator selection process, to suit their unique cultural and community contexts and priorities.

About the Indicators

Indicators are measures used to assess and monitor things that matter. Indicators can:

  • Be quantitative (reported in numbers) and qualitative (reported in words).
  • Focus on the individual (person) or the collective (community).
  • Be about activities (measuring if something has been done), performance (how well a system is achieving its purpose), and outcomes (the changed state in short, medium, and long-term).

More information on what makes a good indicator is described in the Full Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool

In this toolkit, indicators are tied to domains of community well-being described in the Conceptual Well-being Framework Tool, such as health, leadership and governance, and culture and language.

Recognizing that any one single indicator cannot capture the full nuance, breadth, and complexity inherent to defining well-being, the toolkit presents a balanced set of indicators. Together, these  provide a more complete picture of community well-being and reflect the understanding that everything is related, and that well-being is produced by the interconnectedness and balance of many aspects of life.

Working with the Recommended Indicator List

The Recommended Indicator List provides a set of indicators across eight domains. It is intended to be a starting point, recognizing that each SGIG has unique goals, capacities, and cultural context.

To tailor this starting point to your SGIG, choices will need to be made about:

  • Scope: How broadly and comprehensively you are aiming to measure well-being.
  • Selection:  Which specific indicators you are choosing to represent well-being.
  • Customization: Adjusting those specific indicators to ensure cultural and contextual match for your SGIG.
  • Perceptions and Attitudes vs. Knowledge Testing: Questions to inform indicators can either ask respondents how they feel about a particular subject or how they self-rate their knowledge, or sometimes these questions can be formulated in a way that more objectively tests respondent’s knowledge.

Engagement may be required throughout the process of scoping, selection, and customization. For more details on engagement, download the full Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool.

Scope

This involves making decisions about which aspects of well-being you want to measure – essentially, choosing your priority domains from the Conceptual Well-being Framework and Recommended Indicator List. This decision will be influenced by a multitude of factors that are unique to your situation.

For example:

  • An SGIG may be choosing indicators of well-being to include in its strategic plan.
  • An SGIG may be choosing indicators specific to its health and wellness department.
  • An SGIG may be choosing indicators for a census they plan to run with their membership and they would want to run this survey every 5 years.

If the SGIG is specifically planning a primary data collection project utilizing these indicators, there are additional scope constraints to consider, particularly related to the time, budget, and people available to support the project. Generally speaking, working with a larger number of indicators will require more engagement, data collection, analysis, and reporting – meaning more time and expense.

Guiding questions when determining scope:

  • Are there specific domains of well-being that are the priority for measurement? Or is your project specifically about a comprehensive picture of well-being?
  • What is the purpose of selecting these indicators at this time? What do you aim to do with these indicators?
  • What do you have the capacity (people, time, and funding) to undertake?

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Scoping

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Scoping

Fictional Case Study

The Sulingituk Government recently decided to introduce a new tool to manage information and to help with data collection. This will involve the transition away from paper filing towards an online, cloud-based system.

read more

Selection

This involves making decisions about the specific indicators you are choosing to measure, which best reflect your SGIG’s definitions of well-being, community circumstances, and priorities.

Some considerations in selecting a subset of indicators, or removing indicators from your list:

  • A smaller number of meaningful indicators is better than a long list of semi-relevant ones, and a subset is more cost-effective to measure. Do you have an overall target number of indicators you are trying to stay within? Can you undertake ranking and scoring of the indicators in order to stay within this number, for example, by applying a consistent framework for indicator evaluation like the one included here?
  • Does the concept underlying the indicator apply to your SGIG?
  • Does the indicator produce data that your SGIG can act upon in some way? Will these data help your SGIG move toward its vision and goals? Are we interested in understanding changes in this area?

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Selection

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Selection

Fictional Case Study

The Sulingituk Government recently decided to introduce a new tool to manage information and to help with data collection. This will involve the transition away from paper filing towards an online, cloud-based system.

read more

Customization

To ensure relevance to each SGIG’s cultural and community context and priorities, the Recommended Indicator List is designed to be customizable by each SGIG in terminology, examples and options, and complexity. 

For detailed information on developing indicators, customizing terminology, examples and options, and complexity, download the full Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool.

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Complexity

SULINGITUK GOVERNMENT: Complexity

Fictional Case Study

The Sulingituk Government recently decided to introduce a new tool to manage information and to help with data collection. This will involve the transition away from paper filing towards an online, cloud-based system.

read more

Recommended Indicator List

The following is a list that contains all of the indicators that can be found in the full Indicator Guide & Recommended Indicators Tool. Once downloaded, SGIGs will see each indicator broken down into a definition and a suggested way to calculate the indicator is provided, along with an example survey question.

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Core Well-Being

  1. Balance
  2. Happiness
  3. Belonging
  4. Personal Agency
  5. Family Connection
  6. Community Cohesion


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Health

  1. Self-rated Health
  2. Indigenous Medicine
  3. Health Care Access
  4. Health Care Satisfaction
  5. Health Conditions
  6. Sleep
  7. Healthy Behaviours


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Culture, Language, Heritage & Identity

  1. Pride in Indigenous Identity
  2. Participation in Cultural Practices
  3. Knowledge of Cultural Practices
  4. Learning about Cultural Practices
  5. Language Fluency
  6. Language Learning


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Infrastructure, Programs & Services

  1. Safe Drinking Water
  2. Community Infrastructure
  3. Community Services Satisfaction
  4. Acceptable Housing
  5. Housing Satisfaction
  6. Community Safety


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Leadership and Governance

  1. Trust in Leadership
  2. Sufficiency of Information
  3. Comfort Participating in Governance
  4. Ability to Exercise Treaty Rights
  5. Equity Among [Members]


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Education, Capacity & Employment

  1. Employment Rate
  2. Job Satisfaction
  3. Income
  4. Food Security
  5. Source of Livelihood
  6. Educational Attainment
  7. Education Support
  8. School Satisfaction
  9. Educational Aspirations


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Land, Stewardship & Environment

  1. Activities on the Land
  2. Limitations to Activities on the Land
  3. Indigenous Food Consumption
  4. Sufficiency of Cultural Resources
  5. Connection to the Land
  6. Concern for the Environment


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External Influence

  1. Cultural Safety
  2. Racism
  3. Stress